QoS Classifier Maps

View, add, or modify a QoS (quality of service) classifier map.

Navigation

Navigate using the tab icons. Hover over an icon to see the name of the tab.

Configure > Common Objects > QoS > Classifier Maps > classifier_map

or

Configure > Network Policies > policy_name > Additional Settings > QoS Options > Classifier Maps > classifier_map

About QoS Classifier Maps

QoS (Quality of Service) is the prioritizing of different types of traffic to optimize traffic forwarding through a network. Using a classifier map, you can map traffic to Extreme Networks QoS classes by service type, by specific MAC OUIs, by individual SSIDs, and by priority numbers in various standard QoS classification systems (802.1p/DiffServ/802.11e). The device then prioritizes, processes, and forwards the incoming traffic as determined by the QoS level to which it is mapped. For outgoing traffic, devices make use of marker maps.

When a device applies a classifier map, it checks if an incoming packet matches a setting in the map by checking for matches in the following order, and then uses the first match it finds:

  1. Services
  2. MAC OUIs
  3. SSIDs
  4. 802.1p/DiffServ/802.11e

For example, if a packet with a source or destination MAC address matching an OUI mapped to class 5 and a service mapped to class 3 arrives at an SSID mapped to class 4, the device maps it to class 3 because the service-to-Extreme Networks class mapping is the first match the device finds.

To map a traffic category to an Extreme Networks QoS class, select the specified tab, and then define the traffic settings described in the following sections.

  • Be sure to enable all the categorization methods that you want devices to use when assigning incoming traffic to various Extreme Networks QoS classes. Because a network policy can reference just one classifier map, make sure the map includes everything that the devices to which you apply the network policy need.

Services

Extreme Networks devices can map incoming traffic to classes based on the network or application service type defined in the classifier map. To define services, configure the following settings.

Services: Choose either Network Services or Application Services.

Select one or more existing services (up to a maximum of 100) that you want to map to a class, and then select Save. Choose Select..., and filter services by typing part or all of a service name in the Filter field or choose services individually. Select Save.

QoS Class: Choose one of the classes to which you want to map the selected services or applications.

Action: Choose Permit to pass the traffic through devices or choose Deny to block it.

The permit and deny actions in a QoS policy enable devices to enforce a simple stateless firewall policy that inspects packets individually, not within the context of an ongoing session. Because a stateless firewall configured with a policy that permits outgoing requests does not associate the corresponding incoming responses to the permitted outgoing requests, you must configure a separate policy permitting the return traffic. A stateful firewall maintains a table internallythat it uses to associate corresponding outgoing and incoming traffic as part of the same session.

Logging: Enable to allow devices to log traffic that matches the service-to-Extreme Networks class mapping. (Devices log traffic whether the action is permit or deny.) The main reason to log traffic is to see if the devices are receiving expected—or unexpected—types of traffic when you debug connectivity issues. You can see the log entries in the event log on devices using the show logging buffered command. If you configure the device to send event logs to a syslog server, you can also see the log entries there.

Select again to configure additional service- or application-to-Extreme Networks QoS class definitions.

MAC OUIs

Extreme Networks devices can map traffic to classes based on either the source or destination MAC OUI in a packet.

MAC OUIs: Choose the name of a previously defined MAC OUI (also known as a MAC vendor ID) from the . If you do not see a MAC OUI that you want to use, select New, and define one.

QoS Class: Choose one of the classes to which you want to map traffic from the MAC OUI.

Action: Choose Permit to pass traffic matching the source MAC OUI through the device. Choose Deny to block it. The permit and deny actions in a QoS policy enable devices to enforce simple stateless firewall policies.

Logging: (Enabled by default.) When enabled, ExtremeCloud IQ Pilot logs traffic that matches the MAC OUI-to-Extreme Networks class mapping to help you determine if the devices are receiving expected—or unexpected—types of traffic when you debug connectivity issues. Choose Disable to prevent logging. You can see the log entries in the event log on devices using the show logging bufferedcommand. If you configure the device to send event logs to a syslog server, you can also see the log entries there.

Select again to add additional MAC OUI-to-Extreme Networks QoS class definitions.

SSIDs

Devices can map traffic to Extreme Networks classes based on the SSID (service set identifier) that a packet traverses—either the SSID on which it arrives or the SSID on which it leaves.

SSIDs: Choose the name of a previously defined SSID.

QoS Class: Choose one of the Extreme Networks classes to which you want to map traffic using this SSID.

Select again to configure additional SSID-to-Extreme Networks QoS class definitions.

802.1p / DiffServ / 802.11e

Extreme Networks devices can apply priority and class mappings to incoming traffic based on the priority markers of standard QoS classification systems in use in the surrounding network: IEEE 802.1p, DSCP (DiffServ codepoint), or IEEE 802.11e. A device can map the values used in these QoS classification systems to the classes in the Extreme Networks QoS classification system, process the traffic according to the class to which it is mapped, and then—using a marker map—map the classes back to appropriate values in an external classification system before forwarding. By doing so, the device can apply its own QoS system to optimize the flow of traffic it processes while supporting a different QoS system used in the surrounding network.

The QoS classification tables in this section show the mapping of priority values of QoS classification systems on incoming packets to classes. To enable the mapping of one of these classification systems to the Extreme Networks system, select 802.1p/DiffServ/802.11e, and then select a system. You can use the default mappings or modify them if necessary.

Select Save to save your configuration to your network policy, and then Next to apply your network policy to selected devices. To deploy your network policy, select Upload.

Modify a Classifier Map

To modify a classifier map, select the name of the map. In the Classifier Map dialog box, you can modify everything except the map name. Select Save.

Remove One or More Classifier Maps

You can remove a single classifier map or multiple maps at the same time.

  • You cannot remove a classifier map if one or more network policies currently reference it. You must first edit the network policies so that they no longer reference the map you want to remove. 

To remove a single classifier map, select the check box for the one that you want to remove, and then select . Or select multiple check boxes and then select to remove multiple maps.

Select Save and Next to apply your network policy to selected devices. To deploy your network policy, select Update Devices.